The pure Nazarite.
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The pure Nazarite. Advice to a young man, concerning an impiety and impurity (not easily to be spoken of) which many young men are to their perpetual sorrow, too easily drawn into. : A letter forced into the press, by the discoveries which are made, that sad occasions multiply, for the communication of it. : [One line of quotation in Latin] by Cotton Mather

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Published by Printed by T. Fleet, for John Phillips, at his shop on the south side of the Town-House. in Boston .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Masturbation

Book details:

Edition Notes

SeriesEarly American imprints -- no. 2458.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination[4], 19, [1] p.
Number of Pages19
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14604707M

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A word taken from the Hebrew for “One Singled Out,” “Dedicated One,” “Separated One.” There were two classes of Nazirites: those who volunteered and those who were appointed as such by God. In the Hebrew Bible, a nazirite or nazarite is one who voluntarily took a vow described in Numbers – "Nazarite" comes from the Hebrew word נזיר nazir meaning "consecrated" or "separated". This vow required the person during this time to: Abstain from all wine and anything else made from grapes. (Traditional rabbinic authorities state that all other types of alcohol were permitted.). As you look at the Nazarite vows, especially in in Numbers 6, you’ll notice six features or qualities. First of all, you’ll notice that the Nazarite vow is unique. This is a very special vow. It’s even called a special vow. Look at verse 2: “When a man or woman makes a special vow.” This is a unique vow. Get this from a library! The pure Nazarite: Advice to a young man, concerning an impiety and impurity (not easily to be spoken of) which many young men are to their perpetual sorrow, too easily drawn into.: A letter forced into the press, by the discoveries which are made, that sad occasions multiply, for the communication of it.: [One line of quotation in Latin].

  A lifelong Nazarite would coil his hair on top of his head to resemble a crown. James the Just vs. Agrippa the Pure. The Book of Acts mentions the high priest and priests eleven times in the beginning chapters as Peter and the disciples’ main enemy. The item The pure Nazarite.: Advice to a young man, concerning an impiety and impurity (not easily to be spoken of) which many young men are to their perpetual sorrow, too easily drawn into.: A letter forced into the press, by the discoveries which are made, that sad occasions multiply, for the communication of it.   The Divine Trinity is revealed in the separation of the Nazarite in Num. 6, for it is only when we enjoy the divine dispensing of the Divine Trinity can we be a genuine Nazarite to God, the Nazarites of today. We have to see that the book of Numbers is not only a record of [ ].   According to the book of Acts, which comes late in the 1st century, the followers of Jesus were called, or perhaps called themselves, “the Way” (Acts ; , 23; , 22). The term “Christian” or “Christians” is mentioned twice, but presented as a newly minted designation, probably coming from outsiders, as the movement spread.

Like a priest a Nazarite was to live a life of strict outward ritual purity that signified an inner purity of heart [for ritual purity of priests see Leviticus , ]. There were temporary vows, such as the vow in Amos and Acts ; , or a child could be dedicated by his mother as in the case of Samson and Samuel. The significance of Messiah and the Nazarite Priesthood, and the Order of Melchizedek. to as an Archangel or Mighty Angel in tenth chapter of The Book of Revelation, Therefore,Messiah is presently a Nazarite Priest, "Set Apart," "pure," and "Holy" unto YHVH. We can read about the Nazarite vow (in Numbers chapter 6). Christians fast, Jews take a Nazarite vow. Acts "Them take, and purify thyself with them, and be at charges with them, that they may shave [their] heads: and all may know that those things, whereof they were informed concerning thee, are nothing; but [that] thou thyself also. Nazirite, (from Hebrew nazar, “to abstain from,” or “to consecrate oneself to”), among the ancient Hebrews, a sacred person whose separation was most commonly marked by his uncut hair and his abstinence from ally, the Nazirite was endowed with special charismatic gifts and normally held his status for life. Later, the term was applied to a man who had voluntarily vowed to.